LSD: Dream Emulator PS1

I’m pretty sure a lot of you out there are familiar with LSD, but I’m sure fewer of you are aware of the weird PS1 game by the same name.

140001552

Released in 1998 by Asmik Ace, LSD: Dream Emulator is a game that received a cult following for its general weirdness, surreal aesthetics and at times outright disturbing imagery.

The game features no real goal or mission, besides exploring different dream worlds that you travel between using a game mechanic referred to as “Linking”. Most borders and objects you find in the game can be linked with by simply colliding with them, which in turns causes the screen to fade into white and transports you into another dreamscape.

Map

The game has individual days, and tends to cycle between days every ten minutes. When this occurs, you’ll see a dream chart that vaguely lists what sort of dream you had during that day. There are many in-game factors that determine this alongside linking and all of them still haven’t been broken down yet, leaving a sense of intrigue and mystery to the player.

Every so often, you might notice a reoccurring character most players tend to refer to as the “Gray Man”. He shows up at random times and hovers towards you. If he manages to get in a close enough radius of the player, the screen will flash briefly and the man will vanish. Though the nature of this character has been heavily speculated, the general idea is that colliding with him triggers the main character to forget events that happened previously and slows down progress. That’s why it’s a good idea to avoid the Gray Man as much as possible.

That being said, the longer you manage to avoid him the more frequently he appears. The more days you last, the weirder your surroundings get. Sometimes to an extreme.

Screen_Shot_2013-01-17_at_5.02.22_PMNote: The character featured in this screenshot is not the Gray Man, but another similar looking character.

The inspiration for this game has been discussed to infinity, but in a recent interview with Osamu Sato goes surprisingly in-depth on the question and pretty much settles the debate indefinitely, so here’s a quote from the man himself.

“As for why I made LSD, there were plenty of traditional games, racing and so on, for the PlayStation and the Sega Saturn. I played a bit of this game where you drive a car, and I’d never played a game like that before, so I just sucked at it. I was slamming into things left and right. If you crash into things it’s game over, so it was really boring for me since I was no good at it. So I wanted to make something that even people who sucked at games could play. This is the same line of thinking as what I mentioned earlier about moving on to the next world after you die. So if I crashed into the wall I would be launched into the next world – that’s the LSD link. I wanted to make something where the player explores a world that keeps transforming like that.

I wasn’t sure how to put it all together so it sounded plausible, since nothing like that actually happens in real life, but it does in dreams, right? Like, maybe I was just in Shibuya, but if I were in a dream I could suddenly be in New York, too. You can teleport all over the place, right? I wanted to do something like that. And then in order to fulfill the realities of the project I made a sort of dream diary to use as the raw materials and built the world from that, and there you have LSD.” – Osamu Sato

Well, there you have it. One thing, in case you feel up to trying the game after reading this, I’d highly advise checking out the LSD: Dream Emulator wiki which features a lot of information in regards to game mechanics.

playstation-41510-41327791463

If you’re interested in reading the rest of the interview by Osamu Sato, click this link. Osamu Sato Interview [November 2017]

One thought on “LSD: Dream Emulator PS1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s