LSD Revamped [Fangame]

While on the topic of LSD: Dream Emulator, I feel like highlighting a work in progress fangame that in my opinion is deserving of its own entry.

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LSD Revamped is a love-letter to LSD: Dream Emulator that has been an ongoing project for a while now. Serving as his introduction to game design and the Unity engine, a user going by the alias of Figglewatts has been working on LSD Revamped since 2011 and is still actively developing it to this day in hopes of recreating the original as faithfully as possible (minus the soundtrack) which alone is already an ambitious feat. However, Figglewatts intends to take it even further by implementing Oculus support, mod support, texture packs, and a complete SDK for players to mess around with. Imagine making your very own dreamscapes.

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A playable alpha for this game was released three years ago and is pretty bare-bones, but very impressive on its own regardless. It even features modern FPS mouse controls as an option. It’s still available for download if you want to see it in action for yourself, just don’t go expecting a fully featured game.

You might already be aware of the existence of this game if you read the full interview by the programmer of LSD Osamu Sato which I linked to in the previous entry as he acknowledges it with the following statement.

“Now there’s even some guy who has taken it upon himself to revamp LSD and make it run on the PC. All on his own, of course. Without anyone’s permission. He shouldn’t be doing it, but I sympathize with his efforts.

So you’ve got guys like him, and then there are others taking images [from LSD] and putting them on hoodies and selling them. Or guys putting the soundtrack on cassette and making their own designs for it and selling them, tons of guys like that. And these guys will come and try to post the stuff made on my Facebook. Pretty crazy, huh? They aren’t considering the copyrights or anything at all.”

 

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There are legality concerns that arise with this project, and I truly hope it doesn’t end up getting taken down in the end as I feel like this guy has really been putting his heart and soul into making this game as true to the original as possible. I’ve been following his blog updates, and he has as of late even managed to reverse engineer bits of the original game in order to add authenticity to the final product. Now that’s true dedication. If you’re interested in seeing his updates for yourself, I’d advise checking out his development blog for updates. You can even send in questions. He takes hiatuses every now and again, but always comes back with really insightful updates. They make for really good reads. Either way I’m eagerly looking forward to the next release of this project, and will likely make another write-up dedicated to it once it’s released.

 

 

 

 

 

LSD: Dream Emulator PS1

I’m pretty sure a lot of you out there are familiar with LSD, but I’m sure fewer of you are aware of the weird PS1 game by the same name.

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Released in 1998 by Asmik Ace, LSD: Dream Emulator is a game that received a cult following for its general weirdness, surreal aesthetics and at times outright disturbing imagery.

The game features no real goal or mission, besides exploring different dream worlds that you travel between using a game mechanic referred to as “Linking”. Most borders and objects you find in the game can be linked with by simply colliding with them, which in turns causes the screen to fade into white and transports you into another dreamscape.

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The game has individual days, and tends to cycle between days every ten minutes. When this occurs, you’ll see a dream chart that vaguely lists what sort of dream you had during that day. There are many in-game factors that determine this alongside linking and all of them still haven’t been broken down yet, leaving a sense of intrigue and mystery to the player.

Every so often, you might notice a reoccurring character most players tend to refer to as the “Gray Man”. He shows up at random times and hovers towards you. If he manages to get in a close enough radius of the player, the screen will flash briefly and the man will vanish. Though the nature of this character has been heavily speculated, the general idea is that colliding with him triggers the main character to forget events that happened previously and slows down progress. That’s why it’s a good idea to avoid the Gray Man as much as possible.

That being said, the longer you manage to avoid him the more frequently he appears. The more days you last, the weirder your surroundings get. Sometimes to an extreme.

Screen_Shot_2013-01-17_at_5.02.22_PMNote: The character featured in this screenshot is not the Gray Man, but another similar looking character.

The inspiration for this game has been discussed to infinity, but in a recent interview with Osamu Sato goes surprisingly in-depth on the question and pretty much settles the debate indefinitely, so here’s a quote from the man himself.

“As for why I made LSD, there were plenty of traditional games, racing and so on, for the PlayStation and the Sega Saturn. I played a bit of this game where you drive a car, and I’d never played a game like that before, so I just sucked at it. I was slamming into things left and right. If you crash into things it’s game over, so it was really boring for me since I was no good at it. So I wanted to make something that even people who sucked at games could play. This is the same line of thinking as what I mentioned earlier about moving on to the next world after you die. So if I crashed into the wall I would be launched into the next world – that’s the LSD link. I wanted to make something where the player explores a world that keeps transforming like that.

I wasn’t sure how to put it all together so it sounded plausible, since nothing like that actually happens in real life, but it does in dreams, right? Like, maybe I was just in Shibuya, but if I were in a dream I could suddenly be in New York, too. You can teleport all over the place, right? I wanted to do something like that. And then in order to fulfill the realities of the project I made a sort of dream diary to use as the raw materials and built the world from that, and there you have LSD.” – Osamu Sato

Well, there you have it. One thing, in case you feel up to trying the game after reading this, I’d highly advise checking out the LSD: Dream Emulator wiki which features a lot of information in regards to game mechanics.

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If you’re interested in reading the rest of the interview by Osamu Sato, click this link. Osamu Sato Interview [November 2017]

Throwback Flash Game: Interactive Buddy

Being really into flash games in my childhood, I thought I’d have a piece every so often highlighting specific online games that truly stood out as quality creations.

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Today I’m going to be talking about Interactive Buddy, what it is and why I enjoyed it so much. Interactive Buddy is a free flash game released on Newgrounds in 2005 by user shock-value where you have this little blob companion that you spend time with as you please. Whichever way you choose to interact with him (through violent means or by passive activities) will earn you money, which you then can use to buy new weapons, skins for your buddy, game modes, supernatural abilities and even gain access to a scripting window where you can program various functions if you’re knowledgeable enough. The settings menu is also surprisingly in-depth for a free flash game as you can toggle anti-aliasing, control the strength of the motion blur present in-game and even limit how many objects can be present at once. You can even go as far as set the accuracy of the physics.

The weapons are quite varied, and I was always partial to the landmines. Something about tossing a bunch of mines into the playfield along with a lone baseball for the buddy to chase always satisfied the inner sadist of middle school me.

There are so many aspects about this game I loved. I liked the whole Tamagotchi vibe, the detailed physics, the vast weapon and customization choices and just the overall charm of the buddy. Plus, c’mon, who wouldn’t want to hang out with Napoleon Dynamite?

If you enjoyed Interactive Buddy, check out the App Store and support shock-value by purchasing the sequel “Interactive Buddy 2” that he released in 2012. I’ve had a blast with it personally.

 

Grim Fandango: Remastered PS4 (First Impressions)

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If you’re in the EU region and own a PS4, the January Sale is on and it is enormous. My wallet trembles before all these deals. Since it’s not even January yet, I thought I’d start off easy and bought Grim Fandango: Remastered for roughly $1. Can’t go wrong there, right?

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I’ve been wanting to try this game out for a while after seeing it all over the place during most major sales, and my initial impression of the game is that it’s definitely a gem.

Developed by Lucasarts and primarily Tim Schafer (think Tales Of Monkey Island, Psychonauts, Brutal Legend etc) is a game originally released in 1998 that’s very charming and witty as well as nail-bitingly hard in certain aspects. That being said, it only makes the sense of accomplishment that much sweeter once you figure out a solution to one of the games many puzzles. The gameplay is quite similar to that of a point and click adventure, finding random items scattered all over the world and trying to figure out how to use them to progress in the story. Certain puzzles are definitely cryptic, and you really have to approach it with an old-school adventure game sense if you wish to make progress. There are definitely hints, but more often than not they aren’t spoon-fed to you so you really have to pay attention to the dialog.

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You play as Manny, a character who wasn’t exactly a good samaritan while living so now he’s stuck in limbo with a dead-end job which has him scouting for potential clients that have also passed away and offer them various care packages to lead them onto the afterlife in varying degrees of comfort depending on their budget and how they were as a person when they were alive.

The game has numerous options to tinker with, and you can change between the old-school look and the remastered visuals on-the-fly. It’s quite interesting to see the contrast in certain areas. There’s also an optional developer’s commentary, which I find to be a great addition and something I wish more devs would add to their games.  The base game used tank controls which are also optional (There’s a trophy for beating the game using these) but something worth keeping in mind is that the game doesn’t save automatically, so it’s generally a good idea to save every once in a while so you don’t forget.

The game is in 4:3 and hasn’t been converted to 16:9 (widescreen) for the remaster. This isn’t a deal-breaker for me by any means, but something you might want to know. The game has many varying settings, such as 4:3 with borders or a pseudo 16:9 which is where the screen has been pretty much stretched horizontally to give the illusion of wide-screen. Personally, I stuck with the borders but it all comes down to personal preference.

Overall, I think this was a well-made adaptation of a classic game and I think it deserves all the acclaim it gets. If you have a PS4 and haven’t played Grim Fandango at this point, consider buying it now while the January Sale is on. Or if you’re a PC user, check out the Winter Sale on Steam.

 

 

 

 

Short Write-Up About The Game Year Of 2017

As the year is nearing its close, I’d like to list the main reason I felt 2017 was such a great year for gaming along with a list of general games I felt really set the bar high. Enjoy this short write-up.

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First off, the introduction of the Nintendo Switch. With such a strong line-up of games this year, it’s hard to believe that it hasn’t even been a year since this console was released. With titles such as Zelda: Breath Of The Wild, Super Mario Odyssey, Skyrim, DOOM, LA Noire, Splatoon 2 and ARMS all in the same year it’s evident Nintendo isn’t playing around this time around after the poor reception of the Wii U.

Add to the fact that the Virtual Console hasn’t even been introduced yet, Metroid Prime 4 is geared up for a 2018 release along with a potential release of a mainline Pokemon game as well and you’ve already got an exciting next year for Nintendo fans. Personally I’m holding out a Smash Bros 4 and Super Mario Maker port. Also, I need Gamecube VC in my life.

To be honest however, I feel as though there have been great game releases all around the board. We’ve got Cuphead, Steins;Gate 0, Sonic Mania, Okami HD, Horizon: Zero Dawn, Nier: Automata, The Crash N-Sane Trilogy, Resident Evil 7, Persona 5, Assassin’s Creed Origins, A Hat In Time and Yooka-Laylee (sue me)

Even now I’m certain I’m forgetting a numerous amount of quality titles, but it’s just been too much for me to process. My backlog is becoming sentient at this point. That being said, I hope 2018 mellows out a bit, or else I might end up putting myself into debt.

Either way, Happy Holidays to everyone!