Celeste: First Impressions

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When Celeste was released earlier this year I noticed it gained traction surprisingly quickly on /r/NintendoSwitch so I was keen to check it out. Funny enough, when the game was announced during the Nintendo Mini-Direct alongside Fe I was actually more interested in the former, but as the tables turned I’ve now beaten Celeste (not 100%) and haven’t even touched Fe yet. Be warned, as this entry will include spoilers regarding the storyline so if you don’t want to see that then feel free to read this at another time.

Story

The storyline of Celeste centers around a woman named Madeline in her quest to reach the peak of Celeste Mountain. During her travels, she stumbles upon several side-characters that she gets more aquainted with as the journey progresses. The game also tackles elements such as anxiety and depression, and takes quite a realistic approach in doing so. The dialogue is very well-written, and quite humorous at times as well. The characters are likable. It all really comes together and adds to the charm that in turn keeps the player invested and motivated to push onwards.

Presentation

Celeste looks very visually pleasing, in my opinion. Backgrounds are nicely fleshed out, the colors are vibrant, the character designs are very true to their concept design and I especially like how they’re displayed in the dialogue prompts. The attention to detail is reminiscent of Shovel Knight. I had no frame drops throughout my playthrough either, the game is silky smooth in that regard. Overall, I have no complaints concerning the presentation of this game.

 

Gameplay

For me, the gameplay is another aspect that really shines through with Celeste. It’s a hards-as-nails 2D platformer, think Super Meat Boy or I Wanna Be The Guy style of gameplay in a way. The thing that gets me with Celeste’s gameplay though, is that it feels incredibly fair throughout.

The level design is intricate enough to teach players how to navigate through the screens by introducing new gimmicks without being overbearing. It gives you time to adapt to a new style, and then ups the ante once you’ve got the hang of things. Along with really tight controls, it ends up being that much more satisfying in terms of truly feeling in control of your actions. Every death feels like your fault as opposed to being a cheap trick played by the game at your expense. On top of that, for newcomers who aren’t used to slightly unforgiving platformers there’s an assist mode that allows you to add handicaps of sorts such as changing the in-game speed and making Madeline invulnerable.

As you scale the mountain, your deaths symbolise the effort you’ve put into reaching the top with Madeline and it’s almost as though your goals intertwine. It’s similar to a Dark Souls mentoring approach.

Extras

I wouldn’t usually add this category, but in terms of sheer replayability this game is jam-packed with extra content. Dispite the main campaign not being the longest thing out there, there’s tons of addition challenges. Optional collectibles such as Strawberries are placed in each level waiting to be collected, and some of them are a nightmare to collect. The game even outright states “these are just for impressing your friends”, leaving the choice of putting in the extra work in your hands.

Alongside the Strawberries, there’s also cassette tapes that can prove to be quite tough to find. However, if you manage you’ll unlock a whole new version of the world you were referred to as a “B-Side”. From there on you can even unlock a “C-side” if you’re so inclined. Now, the difficulty does get pretty high once you decide the tackle the B and C-sides, so do expect an insane amount of deaths if you decide to tackle these optional bonus worlds.

Another fact worth keeping in mind is the existence of Crystal Hearts. I believe there are eight in total, and honestly you might need a guide to find some of them because a few are them are very well hidden. In fact, collecting some of these opens an optional additional chapter so it might well be worth the effort to find them.

Finally, in one of the chapters there’s a prototype of the original game hidden somewhere I won’t specify. It was a nice touch of the developers to include it as a nod to the game’s original roots. You can really see how much it has truly progressed since then.

Overall:

I enjoyed this game so much more than I initially thought I would. Kudos to the dev team for starting off the gaming year of 2018 so well! I’ve heard talks about a potential level editor being added later on via a patch, and I’d love to tinker around with that. For $20, Celeste is a steal in my opinion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Things The Switch Might See In 2018

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I can feel it in the air. I can almost sense a January Nintendo Direct announcement being tweeted out by Nintendo in the next few days. Of course, I could be wrong but it’s just the feeling I’ve gotten as of late.

As you may have heard by now, the Nintendo Switch just became the worlds fastest selling video game console ever and considering the sales of the Wii that is truly something else. Nintendo has just been knocking it out of the park with the Switch throughout 2017 with game release after game release, giving consumers little to no excuse to not own one. Especially after the flop of the Wii U, the first year line-up for the Switch was a breath of (the wild) fresh air for Nintendo fans all around. However, I’ll spare you the nitty gritty details of the first year as that’s something I plan to tackle in a separate entry.

What I intend to do for this piece is compile a list of things I expect from Nintendo in 2018. I’m going to do my best to keep my expectations as realistic as possible.

 

5. More Wii U ports to the Switch

 

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I know a lot of people might deem this option to be the lazy route for Nintendo to take, but I think it would be very smart as well. The downfall of the Wii U can be deemed a blessing and a curse in that they’re still sitting on quite a few finished Wii U games that could be highly successful on the Switch.

The titles I’m mainly referring to are Super Smash Bros U, Super Mario Maker and Wind Waker HD. I think all three of these titles could heavily benefit from being on the Switch. Don’t get me wrong, I’m evidentally not expecting all three of them to just be announced during the course of 2018 but I am expecting at least one of them to be ported over this year. I feel as though that’s a realistic expectation.

I feel like porting any of these titles would pad out the development time for the creators hard at work on the new Switch titles.

4. Introduction of the paid online service alongside Virtual Console implementation

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I mean, you could argue this is hardly speculation worthy since Nintendo has officially confirmed that the launch of the paid online service is slated for 2018. That being said, I think this will mark the point in which Virtual Console titles will be integrated with the eShop as well.

However you put it, Nintendo intentionally withheld Virtual Console titles for some reason. In my opinion, this is either because they want to re-work them to function differently from their 3DS, Wii and Wii U counter-parts or because they didn’t want them to outshine indie and third-party titles in the eShop and instead opted to introduce them at a later date in order to coincide with the paid online service. How they plan to implement VC with the service remains to be seen, as they could either go the PS+ route or something akin to a Netflix subscription and both are equally enticing.

I do expect there could be more delays in the horizon for this monthly service, but I don’t think Nintendo will drag it out past 2018.

 

3. Fleshing out the bare-bones aspects of the Switch

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I’m hoping Nintendo will introduce Cloud Saves sooner than later, and I’m banking on that this will be the year. Other additions such as themes and a functional internet browser aren’t as expected in my opinion, but would be appreciated regardless.

Hulu was recently added (come to Sweden, you’re past due) which opens up hope for future streaming services like Netflix or HBO.

I think the Switch will receive various UI overhauls during the year, and hopefully that’ll apply to the eShop as well.

2. Super Mario Odyssey DLC

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I definitely find this plausible, seeing as Breath Of The Wild had two DLC expansions released in the span of the same year. They could provide us with new worlds to explore, maybe even a throwback to Delfino Plaza from Sunshine. Either way, I think this is more than just a pipe-dream, so unless they plan to save all the goodies for the inevitable Super Mario Odyssey 2 then I could easily see some more worlds being added in for DLC in the later part of the year.

1. A lot of third-party announcements

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Now that the initial third party games such as Skyrim, DOOM, Rocket League, LA Noire etc have been introduced I think now is the time that the floodgates will open in terms of third party developers announcing content for the Switch. Bethesda was faithful from the very beginning and it paid back in spades. I could easily see them porting other previously released games like one of the Fallout titles in the future, but not necessarily this year.

That being said, I think there’s enough trust in the Switch now for developers to hold off any longer from producing titles for it and I could easily see 2018 filled with quality ports and new releases from third party developers all across the board.

Recently a Brazilian retailer listed a remaster of Burnout Paradise for the PS4, which was also slated for the Switch. I think that announcement will come forth in due time as well.

I can’t tell you what titles as of yet, but I can say with reasonable confidence that I think this year will be a doozy for third party releases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LSD Revamped [Fangame]

While on the topic of LSD: Dream Emulator, I feel like highlighting a work in progress fangame that in my opinion is deserving of its own entry.

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LSD Revamped is a love-letter to LSD: Dream Emulator that has been an ongoing project for a while now. Serving as his introduction to game design and the Unity engine, a user going by the alias of Figglewatts has been working on LSD Revamped since 2011 and is still actively developing it to this day in hopes of recreating the original as faithfully as possible (minus the soundtrack) which alone is already an ambitious feat. However, Figglewatts intends to take it even further by implementing Oculus support, mod support, texture packs, and a complete SDK for players to mess around with. Imagine making your very own dreamscapes.

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A playable alpha for this game was released three years ago and is pretty bare-bones, but very impressive on its own regardless. It even features modern FPS mouse controls as an option. It’s still available for download if you want to see it in action for yourself, just don’t go expecting a fully featured game.

You might already be aware of the existence of this game if you read the full interview by the programmer of LSD Osamu Sato which I linked to in the previous entry as he acknowledges it with the following statement.

“Now there’s even some guy who has taken it upon himself to revamp LSD and make it run on the PC. All on his own, of course. Without anyone’s permission. He shouldn’t be doing it, but I sympathize with his efforts.

So you’ve got guys like him, and then there are others taking images [from LSD] and putting them on hoodies and selling them. Or guys putting the soundtrack on cassette and making their own designs for it and selling them, tons of guys like that. And these guys will come and try to post the stuff made on my Facebook. Pretty crazy, huh? They aren’t considering the copyrights or anything at all.”

 

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There are legality concerns that arise with this project, and I truly hope it doesn’t end up getting taken down in the end as I feel like this guy has really been putting his heart and soul into making this game as true to the original as possible. I’ve been following his blog updates, and he has as of late even managed to reverse engineer bits of the original game in order to add authenticity to the final product. Now that’s true dedication. If you’re interested in seeing his updates for yourself, I’d advise checking out his development blog for updates. You can even send in questions. He takes hiatuses every now and again, but always comes back with really insightful updates. They make for really good reads. Either way I’m eagerly looking forward to the next release of this project, and will likely make another write-up dedicated to it once it’s released.

 

 

 

 

 

Grim Fandango: Remastered PS4 (First Impressions)

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If you’re in the EU region and own a PS4, the January Sale is on and it is enormous. My wallet trembles before all these deals. Since it’s not even January yet, I thought I’d start off easy and bought Grim Fandango: Remastered for roughly $1. Can’t go wrong there, right?

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I’ve been wanting to try this game out for a while after seeing it all over the place during most major sales, and my initial impression of the game is that it’s definitely a gem.

Developed by Lucasarts and primarily Tim Schafer (think Tales Of Monkey Island, Psychonauts, Brutal Legend etc) is a game originally released in 1998 that’s very charming and witty as well as nail-bitingly hard in certain aspects. That being said, it only makes the sense of accomplishment that much sweeter once you figure out a solution to one of the games many puzzles. The gameplay is quite similar to that of a point and click adventure, finding random items scattered all over the world and trying to figure out how to use them to progress in the story. Certain puzzles are definitely cryptic, and you really have to approach it with an old-school adventure game sense if you wish to make progress. There are definitely hints, but more often than not they aren’t spoon-fed to you so you really have to pay attention to the dialog.

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You play as Manny, a character who wasn’t exactly a good samaritan while living so now he’s stuck in limbo with a dead-end job which has him scouting for potential clients that have also passed away and offer them various care packages to lead them onto the afterlife in varying degrees of comfort depending on their budget and how they were as a person when they were alive.

The game has numerous options to tinker with, and you can change between the old-school look and the remastered visuals on-the-fly. It’s quite interesting to see the contrast in certain areas. There’s also an optional developer’s commentary, which I find to be a great addition and something I wish more devs would add to their games.  The base game used tank controls which are also optional (There’s a trophy for beating the game using these) but something worth keeping in mind is that the game doesn’t save automatically, so it’s generally a good idea to save every once in a while so you don’t forget.

The game is in 4:3 and hasn’t been converted to 16:9 (widescreen) for the remaster. This isn’t a deal-breaker for me by any means, but something you might want to know. The game has many varying settings, such as 4:3 with borders or a pseudo 16:9 which is where the screen has been pretty much stretched horizontally to give the illusion of wide-screen. Personally, I stuck with the borders but it all comes down to personal preference.

Overall, I think this was a well-made adaptation of a classic game and I think it deserves all the acclaim it gets. If you have a PS4 and haven’t played Grim Fandango at this point, consider buying it now while the January Sale is on. Or if you’re a PC user, check out the Winter Sale on Steam.

 

 

 

 

DolphinVR – Playing Gamecube Games in Virtual Reality

Dispite being reasonably dated at this point and fairly difficult to understand at times, DolphinVR is a great example of emulation and VR support going hand in hand. The games that really shine in my opinion from what I’ve tried is The Legend Of Zelda: Wind Waker, Metroid Prime, F-Zero GX and Super Smash Bros Melee.

It’s compatible with Gamecube games, Wii games, and various Virtual Console titles. Word of warning however, all sorts of graphical glitches can occur even on supported games. You’re going to have to optimize most of these games individually, and it will be tedious. The creator of the emulator doesn’t update DolphinVR much, if at all so your main hope is to find other users who’ve dabbled in playing the games you’re interested in to find out optimal per game settings. The DolphinVR mantra is certainly trial and error, but for me it was definitely worth it just to inhabit the worlds of my youth. Sometimes it’s fun to throw a random Gamecube game at it from time to time just to see if it’s compatible or not. Even if it seems like it’s not, I tend to take some time to troubleshoot the graphical settings until I can determine whether or not the game is a bust for the time being. For instance, I got Beyblade V-Force running at one point and it was surprisingly immersive. Here’s the footage of that if you’re interested in getting a glimpse for yourself.

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I also tried out some Virtual Console titles which enabled me to play Super Mario 64 and Starfox 64 in VR as well. It was a blast, although Super Mario 64 has a flickering sky bug so you’ll either have to install a texture pack or use OpenGL’s Free Look plugin in order to move the camera so that the clouds don’t cause any discomfort.

Either way, it’s up to you but I highly recommend trying out one of the games listed above in DolphinVR if you have an Oculus or a Vive. You can download the latest version of it by clicking on the link below as it will redirect you the site.

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Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more updates!