Petscop: The Game From 1997 That Doesn’t Exist

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Apparently I’m pretty late on this one as it initially started in March 2017, but when I discovered Petscop yesterday I knew I had to write about it.

If you’ve sat up at 3 AM reading creepypastas about obscure games being found at yard sales that may or may not be haunted Petscop might be right up your ally as that’s pretty much what this is in video form. There are subtle elements shared between these mediums, albeit without reaching the “hyper realism” level of absurdity that creepypastas tend to end up on by turning everything up to eleven in an attempt to scare the reader.

Petscop is an ongoing webseries revolving around a teenager named Paul who is playing a fictional PS1 game he received as a Christmas present in a blind Let’s Play format. His playthrough starts off innocently enough as footage he made for a friend in order to document the game, but for reasons still largely unknown as of yet he’s pretty much forced against his will to keep playing and recording footage of it for an audience to see. Clues are scattered all throughout this series in the form of single frame occurrences, odd sound cues and cryptic dialogue intended for the viewers to pick apart and attempt to piece together the full story with.  I won’t give away a lot of plot details, but let me tell you it gets pretty intense later on. The storyline delves into very dark themes, and is certainly intended for a mature audience so keep that in mind.

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Dispite only discovering it, I’ve binged watched the entire thing (12 episodes as of writing this piece) and it’s quite unbelievable how well all these elements mesh together in order to make a compelling, but very disturbing narrative.

First off, there’s the fact that the game looks so authentic. It really taps into the whole bizzarro world factor many old PS1 games share with their low resolution graphics and limited draw distance that ups the creepy factor on its own. Dispite likely not being a complete playable game they intend to release once the series is over, someone has actually programmed this to function properly for the scenes required and gone to some lengths to make it as true to our childhood as they possibly could.

Secondly, the horror element is done just right in my opinion. Besides intentional cheesiness meant to replicate that of an actual Let’s Play, nothing is really over the top. At times it even comes off of as slightly mundane, but it’s the feeling of uncertainty and not knowing what to expect that keeps you on the edge of your seat throughout. While I’m on the topic, the sound design is phenomenal. There are in-game noises for footsteps, dialogue prompts and picking up collectibles that really adds to the immersion and builds the atmosphere of the in-game world in a way that is very unique to this series.

Lastly, there’s Paul himself. As a protagonist he’s definitely charismatic enough to lead the series and his performance throughout is highly believable. His jump cuts and occasional stutters lend well to the idea that he’s recording himself playing a game. There’s even certain points where he leaves the footage on when he’s not present in order to experiment with game progression. His reactions are quite subdued, which  compliments the games subtle nature nicely and makes him very complex and well-rounded as you ponder what role he plays in the bigger picture and how he ties into the main narrative.

Overall, I’d definitely recommend Petscope to anyone who is a fan of video game creepypastas but doesn’t mind a series that gradually builds up the horror aspects. It’s a slow burner for sure, but one that I think will be remembered quite fondly with time. Especially among those who have a form of attachment to the PS1 era of games and are familiar with the presentation of Let’s Plays from its origin point and beyond. If this series was available for purchase, I’d buy it in a heartbeat.

 

 

LSD: Dream Emulator PS1

I’m pretty sure a lot of you out there are familiar with LSD, but I’m sure fewer of you are aware of the weird PS1 game by the same name.

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Released in 1998 by Asmik Ace, LSD: Dream Emulator is a game that received a cult following for its general weirdness, surreal aesthetics and at times outright disturbing imagery.

The game features no real goal or mission, besides exploring different dream worlds that you travel between using a game mechanic referred to as “Linking”. Most borders and objects you find in the game can be linked with by simply colliding with them, which in turns causes the screen to fade into white and transports you into another dreamscape.

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The game has individual days, and tends to cycle between days every ten minutes. When this occurs, you’ll see a dream chart that vaguely lists what sort of dream you had during that day. There are many in-game factors that determine this alongside linking and all of them still haven’t been broken down yet, leaving a sense of intrigue and mystery to the player.

Every so often, you might notice a reoccurring character most players tend to refer to as the “Gray Man”. He shows up at random times and hovers towards you. If he manages to get in a close enough radius of the player, the screen will flash briefly and the man will vanish. Though the nature of this character has been heavily speculated, the general idea is that colliding with him triggers the main character to forget events that happened previously and slows down progress. That’s why it’s a good idea to avoid the Gray Man as much as possible.

That being said, the longer you manage to avoid him the more frequently he appears. The more days you last, the weirder your surroundings get. Sometimes to an extreme.

Screen_Shot_2013-01-17_at_5.02.22_PMNote: The character featured in this screenshot is not the Gray Man, but another similar looking character.

The inspiration for this game has been discussed to infinity, but in a recent interview with Osamu Sato goes surprisingly in-depth on the question and pretty much settles the debate indefinitely, so here’s a quote from the man himself.

“As for why I made LSD, there were plenty of traditional games, racing and so on, for the PlayStation and the Sega Saturn. I played a bit of this game where you drive a car, and I’d never played a game like that before, so I just sucked at it. I was slamming into things left and right. If you crash into things it’s game over, so it was really boring for me since I was no good at it. So I wanted to make something that even people who sucked at games could play. This is the same line of thinking as what I mentioned earlier about moving on to the next world after you die. So if I crashed into the wall I would be launched into the next world – that’s the LSD link. I wanted to make something where the player explores a world that keeps transforming like that.

I wasn’t sure how to put it all together so it sounded plausible, since nothing like that actually happens in real life, but it does in dreams, right? Like, maybe I was just in Shibuya, but if I were in a dream I could suddenly be in New York, too. You can teleport all over the place, right? I wanted to do something like that. And then in order to fulfill the realities of the project I made a sort of dream diary to use as the raw materials and built the world from that, and there you have LSD.” – Osamu Sato

Well, there you have it. One thing, in case you feel up to trying the game after reading this, I’d highly advise checking out the LSD: Dream Emulator wiki which features a lot of information in regards to game mechanics.

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If you’re interested in reading the rest of the interview by Osamu Sato, click this link. Osamu Sato Interview [November 2017]